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U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

Department of
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District 5SR
Division 23 Flotilla 23-6
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Donald M. Haskin, Flotilla Commander

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Waterway Watch

Waterway Watch

Boating Safety Tip of the Day
Show courtesy.

A common complaint from boaters is the lack of courtesy shown by boaters to each other. Don’t be a discourteous boater. Obey the rules of the road. Adjust speed near paddle craft. Watch your wake. Arrive alive knowing you helped other boaters have fun and be safe as well.

Posts Tagged ‘Boating Safety’

Unfortunately, the risk of a deadly accident is increased with cold weather. Extra caution and preparation should be taken before heading out on the water in winter. Read the rest of this entry »
The Coast Guard stresses safety and preparation as boaters take to the water for the forecasted warm weather. Read the rest of this entry »
Compared to 2008, the number of boating accidents decreased 1.23%, but the number of boating fatalities increased 3.81%. Read the rest of this entry »
The Coast Guard urges boaters to be cautious and stay in port from North Carolina to New Jersey Tuesday through Wednesday due to a gale-force wind warning from the National Weather Service. Read the rest of this entry »

5th District
U.S.


Department of Homeland Security Coast Guard logo

News Release

Date: January 15, 2010

Contact: Public Affairs Det. Baltimore
(757) 434-7335

Coast Guard commences breaking in Chesapeake Bay

BALTIMORE - Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class Marc Snyder takes the helm of the Coast Guard Cutter Capstan, a 65-foot Small Harbor Tug homeported in Philadelphia, PA., during an ice breaking evolution in the northern Chesapeake Bay to keep shipping channels open for commerce, Jan. 9, 2010. Besides domestic ice breaking, the Capstan's missions include search and rescue, marine environmental protection, maritime law enforcement, aids to navigation and commercial fishing vessel safety. U.S. Coast Guard photo.
BALTIMORE – Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class Marc Snyder takes the helm of the Coast Guard Cutter Capstan, a 65-foot small harbor tug homeported in Philadelphia, PA., during an ice breaking evolution in the northern Chesapeake Bay to keep shipping channels open for commerce, Jan. 9, 2010. Besides domestic ice breaking, the Capstan’s missions include search and , marine environmental protection, maritime law enforcement, aids to navigation and commercial vessel . U.S. Coast Guard photo.

BALTIMORE - The Coast Guard has commenced icebreaking operations in an effort to maintain safe and navigable waterways in and around the Port of Baltimore.

Two 65-foot small harbor tugs from both Coast Guard Sectors Hampton Roads, in Portsmouth, Va., and Sector Delaware Bay, in Philadelphia, Pa., will help maintain waterways and keep them open to commercial vessels.

“The importance of this mission in the Chesapeake Bay and surrounding area is to keep commerce flowing to places that could be critically affected when a barge cannot transport goods,” said Lt. Cmdr. Amy M. Beach, chief of the Ports and Waterways Division at Coast Guard Sector Baltimore.

The Cutter Chock, homeported in Portsmouth, and the Cutter Capstan, homeported in Philadelphia, have been breaking ice in the Wicomico River and the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal in order to maintain the flow of essential goods, like home heating oil for residents, and to minimize the impact ice may have on the area’s economy.

While the Coast Guard cutters free ships locked in ice and create a navigable route to travel upon, they also retain capabilities to shift to the many other Coast Guard missions, such as search and rescue, law enforcement and homeland security. Additionally, breaking up the ice enables other Coast Guard units and first responders to safely respond to emergencies on the water.

The Coast Guard will continue to monitor the upper Chesapeake Bay and surrounding rivers throughout the to ensure that ice will have as minimal an impact to the area as possible.

This time of year is especially dangerous due to the freezing water temperatures and mariners are urged to use caution. Additionally, the Coast Guard urges people to not walk across ice. No matter how thick or sturdy it may appear, the potential for a life threatening accident is possible. Mariners can receive information regarding current ice conditions by calling Coast Guard Sector Baltimore’s Ice Information Line at 410-576-2682.

For more information on national ice conditions go to www.natice.noaa.gov


BALTIMORE- The Coast Guard Cutter Chock, a 65-foot Small HarborTtug homeported in Portsmouth, Va., breaks ice in the mouth of the Wicomico River near Crisfield, Md., Jan. 14, 2010. The Chock will be used to break ice to ensure the continued safe transit for barges and cargo vessels making their way north from Virginia. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Brandyn Hill.
BALTIMORE- The Coast Guard Cutter Chock, a 65-foot small harbor tug homeported in Portsmouth, Va., breaks ice in the mouth of the Wicomico River near Crisfield, Md., Jan. 14, 2010. The Chock will be used to break ice to ensure the continued safe transit for barges and cargo vessels making their way north from Virginia. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Brandyn Hill.



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Classes begin February 15, 2010 and end April 5, 2010. Justin time for boating season. A final exam is given at the April 5 session. The class consists of eight, two-hour sessions on Mondays from 7:00 to 9:00 P.M.  The cost is $30 per student. Preregistration is requested. Please use the instructor contact form at this website to register. Walk-ins will be taken if space permits.

Classes will be held at the Calvert Community Resources Building, 30 Duke Street, Prince Frederick, MD, directly across from the Prince Frederick Post Office.

Your instructors are members of the Flotilla of the U.S. .

Get ready for this summer’s boating season! For those born after July 1, 1972, this course satisfies the requirements for the State of Maryland for operating a vessel on Maryland waters and a Maryland Natural Resources Police Card will be issues upon satisfactory completion.

The Flotilla runs this multimedia story on cold water training to show the general how seriously we take the danger. We hope if you are a boater, kayaker, or hunter you will also take seriously.

Detachment New York
U.S. Coast Guard

USCG Banner -Documents

Jan. 11, 2009 
Public Affairs
(212) 668-7114

Multimedia Release

*MULTIMEDIA RELEASE* Coast Guard cold survival training

For a high-res downloadable version, click the Photo – for viewing on YouTube, click Here.

NEW YORK-In this Coast Guard multimedia release, members of Coast Guard Station Kings Point, N.Y., take part in a surprise 24-hour training exercise where crewmembers donned survival suits and swam 250-yards through the freezing waters of Long Island Sound to a deserted island with minimal food, water and had to create their own shelters from materials found on the island, Dec. 10, 2009.

Media are invited to use and distribute this multimedia project via internet and social media sites.


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The U.S. , Flotilla 23-6, will offer the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Police boating consisting of two, five hour sessions between 9:00 AM and 2:00 PM Saturdays, 13 and 20 February 2010. This course is required for the operation of any vessel, boat, or personal watercraft, on Maryland water for persons born after 1 July 1972.  The course will be held at the Civics Center, Broome’s Island.  The cost of this course is $20 per student.  Pre-registration is required and seats are limited.  This course will meet all of the State of Maryland requirements and a Maryland Resources Police Card will be issued for successful completion.

To pre-register for the course use the Public Education Contact Form.



( YouTube Channel) PORTSMOUTH, Va. – Dennis Clements talks about his experience Sunday, Jan. 3, 2010, after being rescued from the Atlantic Ocean 250 nautical miles east of Hatteras, N.C.

The Missouri native was travelling from the Hampton Roads area to the U.S. Virgin Islands when he ran into bad damaging his sailboat Tuesday.

He was attempting to get back to the mainland, but Saturday’s weather was so rough that it set off his Electronic Position , or . That signal notified the Coast Guard which started an incredible effort to the distressed sailor.

The ’s USS Dwight D. Eisenhower launched a helicopter with search and rescue crew after an Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C., HC-130J Hercules aircraft notified them that Clements sailboat rolled and was de-masted and taking on water.

Clements had been ejected from his sailboat and eventually bumped into a Coast Guard dropped life raft in the black of night. The Navy crew arrived on scene and was able to locate Clements by his pocket-sized, non-waterproof flashlight.

More information, photos and video on http://D5.uscgnews.com

Fifth District
U.S.


Department of Homeland Security Coast Guard logo

News Release


Date: January 03, 2010

Contact: Fifth District Public Affairs
(757) 398-6272

Coast Guard, man from sunken sailboat off east coast


PORTSMOUTH, Va. – The Coast Guard and Navy worked together Sunday morning to return a rescued man to shore after his sailboat sank about 250 nautical miles east of Cape Hatteras, N.C.

Coast Guard Fifth District watchstanders received a satellite distress signal at 5:07 p.m. Saturday from the sailboat Gloria A Dios.  They launched an Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C., HC-130J Hercules aircraft crew to search for the sailboat, began broadcasting an Urgent Marine Information Broadcast to notify other mariners, used satellite Enhanced Group Calls to target other vessels in the area for help and diverted an AMVER vessel (a ship participating in the Automated Mutual-Assistance Vessel Rescue System.)

The Hercules crew made contact with the Gloria A Dios operator, Dennis Clements, at about 6:30 p.m. and found that his sailboat had been taking on water since Wednesday due to storms and needed help.  The Coast Guard watchstanders and Navy’s U.S. Second Fleet Maritime Operations Center coordinated to identify the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower and its air assets as the quickest and safest way to rescue Clements.

The crew of the Hercules dropped a life raft near the Gloria A Dios after a large wave demasted it causing two holes in the port side cabin at about 9:30 p.m.   The sailboat sank and Eisenhower’s rescue helicopter crew picked up the man from the water around 10:30 p.m. and flew more than 100 miles back to the carrier with the Hercules flying overhead.

In the meantime, an Air Station Elizabeth City MH-60T Jayhawk helicopter crew had flown to the Eisenhower to refuel.  The rescued man was checked by the Eisenhower’s senior medical officer and the Jayhawk’s crew flew him safely back to Elizabeth City.  The rescued man was back to solid ground Sunday at 3:45 a.m.

“When a mariner in distress is hundreds of miles offshore, the best platform to assist might be a commercial vessel transiting between ports or a DoD asset,” said Lt. Scott L. Farr, a watchstander at the Coast Guard Fifth District Command Center.  “The motor vessel Ryujin was diverted but could not maintain their course to affect a rescue due to heavy seas. Ultimately, the quick and effective coordination between the Fifth District Command Center, Air Station Elizabeth City and the USS Eisenhower provided assistance to this mariner with the use of multiple aircraft by coordinating and leveraging their unique capabilities when no one else was within 100 nautical miles of the sailboat’s position.”



Gloria A Dios operator, Dennis Clements,

Gloria A Dios operator, Dennis Clements,


Download photos and video:

Photo 1

Photo 2

Photo 3

Video – 25mb Windows Media File (prior to demasting)

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Three Maryland boating deaths in 2012. Three sailboat emergencies, 1 death; 1 swimmer death; 1 allision death with two trauma injuries; 1 major injury from gasoline engine fire,

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Our Instagrams
  • A foggy day in Southern Maryland. Good morning shipmates.
  • Wear it!  News media ask the boaters you photograph why they don't. Start the discussion and save a life.
  • Our cold-water survival training was ultimately made possible by the Guardians of  U S Coast Guard Station Annapolis.  Two Guardians hauled each of us onto the deck of a fast boat.  During the training they made sure we were safe.  I am so proud to serve with these men and women. Each one is an outstanding professional.  Thank you Station Annapolis.
  • Once a crew is in the water survival and staying together is key. Chaining together as they do here the crew shares warmth and prolongs life.
  • A face that could be your next door neighbor. Coast Guard Auxiliary members from three Maryland flotillas took their annual cold-water training at Coast Guard Station Annapolis. Bill Smith from the Drum Point Flotilla reflects the serious of his training in his expression. Bill is not new to cold water.
  • To. feller and Bill Smith, Coast Guard Auxiliary, arrive at Coast Guard Station Annapolis for cold-water training.
  • A two-minute lesson that covered finger dexterity after cold water immersion. We placed a hand in cold water while the instructor spoke for two minutes. One we removed our hands we had to pick up the coin on the table. Not as easy as if looks. Try this only with an expert present.
  • Shawn Moore, Auxiliarist was our cold-water instructor.
  • Ray Feller, Auxiliarist  dons his dry suit. The suit provides significant protection in cold water. Having the suit alone is not enough. Knowing how the human body reacts to sudden immersion was the classroom session of our training today.
  • These volunteers attending cold-water survival training today could be your neighbors. Flotillas from Solomons Island to Annapolis were represented today.  Guardians made sure our training was safe. Another reason why I love to say Guardians rock!
Comfortable Lifejackets
Lifejackets are comfortable and they save lives!

Lifejackets are comfortable and they save lives!

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Admiral Lee on Bow Riding

Rear Admiral William "Dean" Lee

“You wouldn’t allow your kids to sit on the hood of your car, so why would you allow them to sit on the bow of your boat?”

Rear Admiral Dean Lee, 5th District commander, United States Coast Guard

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The behaviors Maryland boaters need to change most.

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