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Boating Safety Tip of the Day
Be safe. Be smart when you re-fuel.

Have all passengers disembark before re-fueling. Close all cabin doors and windows. Hold gas nozzle well against the metal of the fuel tank filler pipe. Avoid all spills. Pay close attention to the work at hand.

Posts Tagged ‘Preparedness’

Make preparations for the now!

Date: Oct. 26, 2012
Contact: 5th District Public Affairs
Office: (757) 398-6272

PORTSMOUTH, Va. — The Coast Guard urges mariners to heed warnings as Hurricane Sandy is expected to affect the mid-Atlantic region between North Carolina and New Jersey this weekend.

As Sandy approaches, the Coast Guard urges people to be mindful of the following:

- Anticipate . Mariners are advised that during strong storms drawbridges along the coast may deviate from the normal operating procedures. Drawbridges are authorized to remain closed upon the approach of gale force winds or higher as stated in the Code of Federal Regulations 117.35, which applies to “natural disasters or civil disorders.” Mariners should anticipate bridge closures by listening to the National Service and Coast Guard broadcasts on the storm conditions.

- Stay off the water. The Coast Guard’s search and rescue capabilities are degraded as storm conditions strengthen. This means help could be delayed. Boaters are urged to heed weather watches, warnings and small craft advisories. People should not go out on their boats 48 hours prior to and at least 72-96 hours after a hurricane has passed as debris may be in the water and navigational aids may have shifted.

- Evacuate as necessary. If evacuations are set for an area, the public is urged to heed to those orders. Coast Guard personnel and other emergency responders may not be able to evacuate those in danger during the storm.

- Secure your belongings. Owners of larger boats are urged to move their boats to inland marinas where they will be less vulnerable to breaking free of their moorings or damage. Trailerable boats should be pulled from the water and stored in a place that is not prone to flooding. Those who are leaving their boats in the water are reminded to secure life rings, life jackets, emergency position indicating radio beacons and small boats. These items, if not secured properly, can break free and require valuable search and rescue resources to be diverted to ensure people are not in distress.

- Be cautious of hazardous materials. If you have hazardous materials on or near the water, you are responsible for any spills that may occur. Take the to secure them prior to any .

- Stay clear of beaches. Even the best swimmers can fall victim to the strong waves and rip currents caused by hurricanes. Swimmers are urged to wait until local officials say the water is safe.

- Stay informed. The public should monitor the progress and strength of Sandy through local television, radio and internet. Boaters can monitor its progress on VHF-FM channel 16. Information can also be obtained on port conditions in Hampton Roads by visiting the Coast Guard’s Homeport Site.

- For more information on the progress of Sandy and hurricane , please visit the National Hurricane Center’s website.

###

Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The United States Coast Guard — Proud History. Powerful Future.

Press Release
(Thanks to Calvert County Sheriff via Nixle.com)

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s (FEMA) and the Federal Communications Commission (), the () will conduct the first nationwide test of the (EAS). The nationwide test will occur on Wednesday, November 9 at 2 p.m. (Eastern) time and may last up to three and a half minutes.

The public will hear a message indicating that “This is a test.”The audio message will be the same for both radio, television, and cable.

The National-level EAS is a public alert and warning system that enables the President of the United States to address the American public during extreme emergencies.Similar to local EAS tests that are conducted frequently, the Nationwide Test will involve broadcast radio and television stations, cable television, satellite radio and television services and wireline providers across all states and territories.

Over the past two years and as part of ongoing national planning efforts, FEMA, the FCC and other Federal partners, State, local, tribal and territorial governments, EAS Participants, and others in the EAS Community have been working toward making this test a reality.

As the Federal, State, tribal, territorial and local governments prepare for and test their capabilities, this event serves as a reminder that everyone should establish an emergency preparedness kitand emergency planfor themselves, their families, communities, and businesses. Anyone can visit www.Ready.govfor more information about how to prepare for and stay informed about what to do in the event of an actual emergency.

http://www.fema.gov/emergency/ipaws/eas_info.shtm

Press Release http://www.easalert.org/docs/National%20EAS%20Test%20Informational%20Toolkit_v1_8-15-2011.pdf

5th District Public Affairs
U.S. Coast Guard
News Release
Date: Aug 26, 2011

Contact: Public Affairs Det. Baltimore
(757) 667-1486

BALTIMORE — The Coast Guard Captain of the Port set condition X-ray at 8 a.m. Friday for the Port of Baltimore in preparation for Hurricane Irene.

Condition X-ray is set when gale force winds are expected within 48 hours.

During the next 24 hours the Coast Guard will identify and track all vessels in port, establish contact with emergency management agencies at the local, state and federal levels, and work closely with port and industry officials to minimize damage in the event the impacts the .

Pleasure craft are advised to seek safe harbor. Drawbridges may not be operating if reach 25 mph or when an evacuation is in progress. Mariners can view the latest port updates for Maryland on the Coast Guard’s Homeport site.

Port facilities are advised to review their heavy plans and to take all necessary precautions to prepare adequately for the expected conditions.

If and when port Yankee is set, meaning hurricane force winds are expected within 24 hours, shall be restricted and all movements must be approved by the Captain of the Port.

For information on how to prepare your boat or trailer for a hurricane, please visit http://www.uscg.mil/news/stormcenter/.

For information on Hurricane Irene’s progress and hurricane , please visit the ’s Web page at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/.

Visit the ’s site to stay informed and for tips to prepare and plan at http://www.ready.gov/.

Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The United States Coast Guard — Proud History. Powerful Future.

Annapolis, Md (August 23, 2011) – The Maryland Natural Resources Police (NRP) are asking mariners to make plans to safe guard their vessels from Irene. The recent activity in the Atlantic Ocean should cause boaters to make plans to safe guard their property and lives.

Planning is the key to minimize injury and loss of life. Boaters should make plans well in advance of the so that definite docking, mooring or hauling out of the vessel arrangements can be performed quickly and without delay.

When deciding on storm preparation plans, mariners need to consider size, type of vessel, and location. Current locations may not offer protection from or . Boaters should consider the following when making arrangement for their vessels.

  1. Removing valuable equipment from your vessel to protect it from damage.
  2. Consider removing your vessel from the water to reduce damage from . Vessels on land should be properly stored or tied down to prevent being damage by winds. Small open vessel can be filled with water to lessen the effect of the wind.
  3. Vessels that remain in the water should be moored in safe areas or berths. Lines should be doubled and high on pilings. Remember storm surges can cause tides over the pilings. Install to protect vessel from pilings, or other vessels.
  4. Ensure bilge pumps work properly and that run them fully charged. Seal all openings to make the vessel watertight.
  5. Collect all documents, including insurance policies. Take photographs of vessel and equipment for insurance.
  6. Do not stay aboard vessels during storms. Safe guard human life.

NRP reminds boaters that advance planning can save property and lives. These actions should take place at least 48-72 hours prior to the event to accommodate unforeseen problems. During the storm, occupants should be off the water and residing in safe shelters. Remember, storm conditions could exist that delay or prevent response from emergency personnel.

Additional information on hurricane may be found at www.fema.gov/hazard/hurricane/index.shtm and www.nhc..gov/outreach/prepared_week.shtml


   August 23, 2011

Contact: Sgt. A.A. Windemuth
410-260-8003 office | 410-713-8449 cell
[email protected]

5th District Public Affairs
U.S. Coast Guard
News Release
Date: Aug 22, 2011

Contact: 5th District Public Affairs
(757) 398-6272

PORTSMOUTH, Va. — The Coast Guard urges mariners and residents to begin planning and preparing for Hurricane Irene.

acquire a name when they reach tropical strength with sustained winds reaching 39 mph. They become hurricanes when winds reach 74 mph and become major hurricanes when winds increase to 111 mph.

As storms approach, the Coast Guard urges people to remember these guidelines:

- Stay informed: The public should monitor the progress and strength of the storm through newspapers, the Internet, and local television and radio stations. Boaters can monitor its progress on VHF-FM channel 16. Small and warnings are also available on VHF-FM channel 16.

- Evacuate as necessary: Mandatory evacuation orders should be obeyed. Coast Guard personnel and other emergency responders may not be able to evacuate people in danger during a storm.

- Secure your boats and boating equipment: Owners of large boats are urged to move their vessels to inland marinas where they will be less likely to break free of their moorings or to be otherwise damaged. Boats that can be trailered should be pulled from the water and stored in a place that is not prone to flooding. Those mariners who leave their boats in the water are reminded to secure life rings, life jackets and fenders.

- Be cautious of hazardous materials: If you have hazardous materials on or near the water, you are responsible for any spills that may occur. Take the necessary precautions to secure these materials prior to any .

- Stay clear of beaches: Even the best swimmers can fall victim to the strong waves and rip currents caused by storms. Swimmers are urged to stay clear of beaches until local officials say the water is safe. Rip currents and undertows can drag swimmers away from their boat or the beach and lead to by drowning when they attempt to fight the current and become exhausted.

Mariners are reminded that drawbridges along the coast may deviate from normal operating procedures prior to a storm. They are generally authorized to remain closed up to eight hours prior to the approach of of 32 mph or greater and whenever an evacuation is ordered. Because of the uncertainty of weather movements and related bridge closures, mariners should seek early passage through drawbridges well in advance of the arrival of .

For more information on , please visit the National Center’s Web page at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/.

Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The United States Coast Guard — Proud History. Powerful Future.

Annapolis, Md. (August 5, 2011) – The Maryland Natural Resources Police (NRP) are asking mariners to plan for hurricanes and tropical storms and to safeguard their boats, given the recent activity in the Atlantic Ocean.

“Planning is the key to minimizing injury and loss of life,” said Col. George Johnson IV. “Boaters need to make plans well in advance of a storm so that definite , or hauling arrangements can be performed quickly and without delay.”

When deciding on storm preparation plans, mariners need to consider size, type of boat and location. Current boat locations may not offer protection from or . Boaters should consider the following when making arrangement for their vessels:

  • Remove valuable equipment from a boat to protect it from damage.
  • Consider removing a boat from the water to reduce damage from . Boats on land should be properly stored or tied down to prevent being damaged by winds. Small open boats can be filled with water to lessen the effect of the wind.
  • Boats remaining in the water should be moored in safe areas or berths. Lines should be doubled and high on pilings. Remember storm surges can cause tides over the pilings.
  • Install fenders to protect boats from pilings, or other vessels.
  • Ensure work properly and that run the pumps are fully charged.
  • Seal all openings to make the vessel watertight.
  • Collect all documents, including insurance policies. Take photographs of boats and equipment for insurance
  • Do not stay aboard boats during storms. Safeguard human life.

Boaters should take these actions at least 48-72 hours prior to the event to accommodate unforeseen problems. During the storm, occupants should be off the water and in safe shelters.  NRP reminds boaters that storm conditions can delay or prevent response from emergency personnel.

Additional information on may be found at http://www.fema.gov/hazard/hurricane/index.shtm  and  http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/outreach/prepared_week.shtml


   August 5, 2011

Contact: Sgt. A.A. Windemuth
410-260-8003 office | 410-713-8449 cell
[email protected]

..Exclamation Point..

* TEMPERATURE…MORNING LOWS AROUND 80…QUICKLY RISING TO AROUND 100. (Source: AccuWeather.com)

* HEAT INDEX VALUES…110 TO 115.

PRECAUTIONARY/ ACTIONS…

AN WARNING MEANS THAT A OF DANGEROUSLY HOT TEMPERATURES WILL OCCUR. THE COMBINATION OF HOT TEMPERATURES AND WILL CREATE A IN WHICH ARE LIKELY. DRINK PLENTY OF WATER…STAY IN AN AIR-CONDITIONED ROOM…STAY OUT OF THE SUN…AND CHECK ON RELATIVES AND NEIGHBORS.

TAKE EXTRA PRECAUTIONS IF YOU WORK OR SPEND TIME OUTSIDE. WHEN POSSIBLE…RESCHEDULE TO EARLY MORNING OR EVENING. KNOW THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF HEAT EXHAUSTION AND HEAT STROKE. WEAR LIGHTWEIGHT AND LOOSE-FITTING CLOTHING.

TO REDUCE RISK DURING OUTDOOR WORK…THE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION RECOMMENDS SCHEDULING FREQUENT IN SHADED OR AIR-CONDITIONED ENVIRONMENTS. ANYONE OVERCOME BY HEAT SHOULD BE MOVED TO A COOL AND SHADED LOCATION. HEAT STROKE IS AN EMERGENCY – CALL 9 1 1.

————————————————————————–

Readers of DrumPoint.org:  It is absolutely essential that you HEED this warning. The heat today WILL dramatically effect the human body. Yesterday, your humble editor was over come with HEAT EXHAUSTION while training to use a chain saw at his day job as Season Ranger for Calvert Cliffs State Park. I was with a professional team of employees and volunteers that knew EXACTLY what to do for me. As for myself I have basic Red Cross First Aid under my belt and took the steps to review heat related illnesses in my first aid book before I started working. Even then my confidence was misplaced. I did not however,  lose my nerve or become excited and panic. In any such situation it is ESSENTIAL that when you begin to feel these symptoms that you TELL SOMEONE QUICKLY just like I did. No HERO stuff.

The symptoms first included , dizziness, partial disorientation, then a desire to stay seated and rest, and then nausea. I had less than three hours of exposure to the heat and sun. My co-workers made sure I was kept cool and brought air-conditioned transportation to me so that I did not have to walk out of the forest.  Bless this terrific team and the volunteers of the Friends of Calvert Cliffs.

Needless to say, I DO NOT want to do that again.

What I can do for you today,  is to remind you that the heat you experience working on your vessel today is much worse than what you would experience on land. TAKE APPROPRIATE PRECAUTIONS! DO NOT TAKE UNNECESSARY RISKS. You might even want to cut trips short or decide not to embark. Use the brains you were born with and THINK about the effect of the heat today.

If you are aboard a boat with a master or coxswain that says, “Ah, what’s a little heat. No big deal,” politely decline the trip. This is no day to joke around about safety of passengers and crew. This is a situational awareness day of the highest extreme and every crew member and passenger must depend on each other for their safety.

5th District Public Affairs
U.S. Coast Guard
News Release

Date: Jun 1, 2011

Contact: 5th District Public Affairs
(757) 398-6272

PORTSMOUTH, Va. — The Coast Guard urges mariners and residents to begin planning and preparing for the 2011 Atlantic season, which starts Wednesday.

For the 2011 hurricane season, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is predicting anywhere from 12 to 18 named storms, six to 10 hurricanes and three to six major hurricanes.

acquire a name when they reach tropical storm strength with reaching 39 mph. They become hurricanes when winds reach 74 mph and become major hurricanes when winds increase to 111 mph.

As storms approach, the Coast Guard urges people to remember these guidelines:

- Stay informed: The public should monitor the progress and strength of the storm through newspapers, the Internet, and local television and radio stations. Boaters can monitor its progress on VHF-FM channel 16. Small craft advisories and warnings are also available on VHF-FM channel 16.

- Evacuate as necessary: Mandatory should be obeyed. Coast Guard personnel and other emergency responders may not be able to evacuate people in danger during a storm.

- Secure your boats and boating equipment: Owners of large boats are urged to move their vessels to inland marinas where they will be less likely to break free of their moorings or to be otherwise damaged. Boats that can be trailered should be pulled from the water and stored in a place that is not prone to flooding. Those mariners who leave their boats in the water are reminded to secure life rings, life jackets and fenders.

- Be cautious of hazardous materials: If you have hazardous materials on or near the water, you are responsible for any spills that may occur. Take the necessary precautions to secure these materials prior to any foul weather.

- Stay clear of beaches: Even the best swimmers can fall victim to the strong waves and caused by storms. Swimmers are urged to stay clear of beaches until local officials say the water is safe.  and undertows can drag swimmers away from their boat or the beach and lead to death by drowning when they attempt to fight the current and become exhausted.

Mariners are reminded that drawbridges along the coast may deviate from normal operating procedures prior to a storm. They are generally authorized to remain closed up to eight hours prior to the approach of of 32 mph or greater and whenever an evacuation is ordered. Because of the uncertainty of weather movements and related bridge closures, mariners should seek early passage through drawbridges well in advance of the arrival of .

For more information on hurricane preparedness, please visit the ’s Web page at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/.

###

Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The — Proud History. Powerful Future.

As National Week comes to a close, we wanted to share tips on how to prepare both your home and families before, during, and after severe tropical . All week, we’ve been sharing ways you can get prepared for the various hazards associated with a hurricane, so we wanted to end the week with a more tips on protecting your home and family from a hurricane.

In addition to the tips below, you can get more information on preparing for at www.Ready.gov/hurricanes.

Check out the tips at the website. Remember that residents of also worry during tornado and hurricane season. Be prepared:

via FEMA Blog: Day 7 – Hurricane Preparedness Week: Tips To Stay Safe.

Ninth District External Affairs
U.S. Coast Guard
News Release

Date: May 25, 2011

Contact: Ninth Coast Guard District Public Affairs Office
(216) 902-6020

CLEVELAND — The U.S. Coast Guard reminds all recreational boaters to take advantage of several practices and initiatives that, when applied, will greatly decrease your chances of or injury when boating on America’s waterways.

First, the Coast Guard recommends boaters take approved and take advantage of free vessel checks.

These safety checks and courses are offered by experienced members of the U.S. , U.S. Power Squadrons and various other organizations.

In 2009, 86 percent of in the United States occurred on boats where the operator had not received formal boating safety training, according to the National Transportation Safety Board. The goal of the U.S. Coast Guard and the campaign is to reduce boating fatalities and accidents across the nation.

To view boating safety class schedules throughout the Great Lakes region, click here.

Additionally, the Coast Guard recommends boaters leave float plans with friends or family members before getting underway. A properly-filled-out float plan can provide the Coast Guard with valuable information if a boater gets in trouble and is unable to contact emergency responders. The float plan should include who to contact if the boater is overdue.

“A float plan gives responders vital information such as your intended course and destination, a description of your vessel, and type of safety and survival equipment you have with you,” said Capt. Stephen Torpey, chief of the incident management branch for the Ninth Coast Guard District. “The additional information provided in a float plan helps us direct our search efforts and improves the chances of survival in an emergency.”

More information and an example of a float plan are available here.

Finally, mariners are urged to check the forecast before getting underway. on the Great Lakes can change quickly and unexpectedly. The National Service marine forecast is available here.

###

Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The — Proud History. Powerful Future.

Vessel Safety Check

2012 Vessel Safety Check Decal

The Coast Guard Auxiliary and
the U.S. Power Squadrons
also inspect kayaks
and other paddle craft.

Boat Safe. Boat Smart.
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Remember the Maryland 25
Dead Maryland Boaters in 2011

Three Maryland boating deaths in 2012. Three sailboat emergencies, 1 death; 1 swimmer death; 1 allision death with two trauma injuries; 1 major injury from gasoline engine fire,

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Our Instagrams
  • A foggy day in Southern Maryland. Good morning shipmates.
  • Wear it!  News media ask the boaters you photograph why they don't. Start the discussion and save a life.
  • Our cold-water survival training was ultimately made possible by the Guardians of  U S Coast Guard Station Annapolis.  Two Guardians hauled each of us onto the deck of a fast boat.  During the training they made sure we were safe.  I am so proud to serve with these men and women. Each one is an outstanding professional.  Thank you Station Annapolis.
  • Once a crew is in the water survival and staying together is key. Chaining together as they do here the crew shares warmth and prolongs life.
  • A face that could be your next door neighbor. Coast Guard Auxiliary members from three Maryland flotillas took their annual cold-water training at Coast Guard Station Annapolis. Bill Smith from the Drum Point Flotilla reflects the serious of his training in his expression. Bill is not new to cold water.
  • To. feller and Bill Smith, Coast Guard Auxiliary, arrive at Coast Guard Station Annapolis for cold-water training.
  • A two-minute lesson that covered finger dexterity after cold water immersion. We placed a hand in cold water while the instructor spoke for two minutes. One we removed our hands we had to pick up the coin on the table. Not as easy as if looks. Try this only with an expert present.
  • Shawn Moore, Auxiliarist was our cold-water instructor.
  • Ray Feller, Auxiliarist  dons his dry suit. The suit provides significant protection in cold water. Having the suit alone is not enough. Knowing how the human body reacts to sudden immersion was the classroom session of our training today.
  • These volunteers attending cold-water survival training today could be your neighbors. Flotillas from Solomons Island to Annapolis were represented today.  Guardians made sure our training was safe. Another reason why I love to say Guardians rock!
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Admiral Lee on Bow Riding

Rear Admiral William "Dean" Lee

“You wouldn’t allow your kids to sit on the hood of your car, so why would you allow them to sit on the bow of your boat?”

Rear Admiral Dean Lee, 5th District commander, United States Coast Guard

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