We are Semper Paratus.

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

Department of
Homeland Security

District 5SR
Division 23 Flotilla 23-6
THE DRUM POINT FLOTILLA
Calvert County's
Volunteer Lifesavers

Donald M. Haskin, Flotilla Commander

Join Us!

Join us.

Waterway Watch

Waterway Watch

Boating Safety Tip of the Day
Tip of the Day: Overloading is Dangerous

Never over load your vessel. Check your capacity plate for maximum allowed weight. Evaluate your free board as cargo and passengers board the vessel. Is the load equally distributed fore and aft, port and starboard. Above all use common sense and do not take senseless risks.

Posts Tagged ‘search and rescue mission’

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs
Date: October 13, 2011
Contact: Penny Bailey
Public Affairs
Phone:: 417-425-6155
[email protected]
News Release
Washington – boaters need protection from , both on deck and in the event of falling overboard. Cold water shortens in-water survival time, making a quick rescue essential. Fortunately, you have options whether you hunt, fish, or cruise on cold water. Choose the right gear to increase your chances of surviving a cold-weather mishap.

1. Flotation Coat
Flotation coats provide warmth and double as a should the wearer fall in the water. Float coats are recommended for boaters who boat year-round in locales with moderate air temperatures and cold water. If you boat in extremely cold temperatures, a flotation coat will not protect you from hypothermia if you fall into the water.

2. Immersion or Survival Suit
boating calls for hardy gear. Survival suits protect you from the elements, and provide flotation and hypothermia protection if you enter the water. Wearing a survival suit can increase survival time in cold water.

3.
Dry suits can be instantly drawn tight to prevent water from entering, Appropriate thermal layers worn beneath the dry suit provide insulation and they are not buoyant. Dry suits are suitable for intentional entry into the water, but provide no passive protection if you fall in.

5. Personal Position Locator Beacon
Otherwise known as a PLB, a personal position locator beacon is a scaled down version of the Indicating Radio Beacon (). When immersed in water or manually activated both EPIRBs and PLBs transmit a signal that allows rescuers to pinpoint your location.

6. Personal Emergency Locator Light
An emergency light worn and activated if a person is in the water can attract the attention of rescuers, providing a much more visible target than your head in the water. The bright, flashing light increases the chances of being spotted by rescuers or a passing boater.

7. Flares
Store hand held and/or parachute flares in immersion suit pockets, secured with a lanyard. Study their instructions before you need them.

8. Whistle
Attracting attention will increase your chances of surviving in the water. Whistles are a cheap and simple way to make noise without exhausting yourself. Rescuers are trained to turn off the boat engines and listen for a period of time while they are on search and rescue missions, or a nearby boater may hear the signal. Conventional whistles don’t work if the “pea” inside is wet, so choose a waterproof model.

Common sense can also increase your chances of survival in cold weather. Dress in layers to provide maximum protection and warmth. Technical fibers provide thermal protection and won’t absorb water. Include a hat to protect your head from heat loss. Wear gloves.

Don’t be tempted to skip proper cold weather clothing and gear. Be sure to wear a life jacket and hypothermia protection when boating in the cold.

The Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of the created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary, America’s Volunteer , supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions. For more information about the Coast Guard Auxiliary visit http://www.cgaux.org

###

First District Public Affairs
U.S.
Multimedia Release
Date: July 20, 2011

Contact: First District Public Affairs

(617) 223-8515

BOSTON — The U.S. Coast Guard is looking for a hoax caller that made a false call earlier this month in the Gloucester, Mass., area.

On July 7, 2011, Coast Guard received the Mayday call via VHF-FM radio channel 16 around 10p.m., stating a 24-foot pleasure craft was taking on water with two people aboard roughly 20 to 40 minutes outside Gloucester Harbor. Before losing communication with the Coast Guard, the caller stated both boaters were going to put on their life jackets. No other communications were received.

The Coast Guard launched boats and aircraft in response to the call and searched the waters of Gloucester throughout the night. The cost of the search totaled approximately $132,000.

The search was suspended the following day after no additional information was found and no missing persons were reported to the Coast Guard and local authorities.

Authorities are now utilizing advanced technologies in missions. Rescue 21 is a system the Coast Guard utilizes to locate positions when a distress call is received. This technology helps the Coast Guard locate distressed boaters and has helped locate hoax callers.

When the Coast Guard dispatches its vessels and aircraft in cases of false distress, it not only drains limited resources, but needlessly puts our personnel at risk. Making a false distress call is a federal felony with a maximum penalty of five to 10 years in prison, a $250,000 fine, $8,000 civil penalty and the possible reimbursement to the Coast Guard for the cost of performing the search.

Boaters are reminded that they are responsible for the safety and actions of their passengers and are encouraged to educate them about the proper use of emergency equipment including a . Oftentimes passengers, especially children, may not understand the consequences of playing on the radio and reporting a false distress.

In response to the high number of calls, the Coast Guard offers a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the arrest and prosecution of anyone responsible for making a false distress or hoax call to the U.S. Coast Guard. Anyone with information regarding false is encouraged to contact the U.S. Coast Guard at (617) 557-9091.

Click here for audio of hoax Mayday call

Click here for Coast Guard responses to hoax Mayday call

Click here for CGIS hoax pamphlet

###

Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The — Proud History. Powerful Future.

This tragedy reminds us of just how dangerous and unforgiving our operating environment can be during these violent nor'easters,” said Lt. Jeffrey Craig, Commanding Officer of Station Atlantic City. Read the rest of this entry »
Vessel Safety Check

2012 Vessel Safety Check Decal

The Coast Guard Auxiliary and
the U.S. Power Squadrons
also inspect kayaks
and other paddle craft.

Boat Safe. Boat Smart.
Get the Decal!

Remember the Maryland 25
Dead Maryland Boaters in 2011

Three Maryland boating deaths in 2012. Three sailboat emergencies, 1 death; 1 swimmer death; 1 allision death with two trauma injuries; 1 major injury from gasoline engine fire,

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 7 other subscribers

Our Instagrams
  • A foggy day in Southern Maryland. Good morning shipmates.
  • Wear it!  News media ask the boaters you photograph why they don't. Start the discussion and save a life.
  • Our cold-water survival training was ultimately made possible by the Guardians of  U S Coast Guard Station Annapolis.  Two Guardians hauled each of us onto the deck of a fast boat.  During the training they made sure we were safe.  I am so proud to serve with these men and women. Each one is an outstanding professional.  Thank you Station Annapolis.
  • Once a crew is in the water survival and staying together is key. Chaining together as they do here the crew shares warmth and prolongs life.
  • A face that could be your next door neighbor. Coast Guard Auxiliary members from three Maryland flotillas took their annual cold-water training at Coast Guard Station Annapolis. Bill Smith from the Drum Point Flotilla reflects the serious of his training in his expression. Bill is not new to cold water.
  • To. feller and Bill Smith, Coast Guard Auxiliary, arrive at Coast Guard Station Annapolis for cold-water training.
  • A two-minute lesson that covered finger dexterity after cold water immersion. We placed a hand in cold water while the instructor spoke for two minutes. One we removed our hands we had to pick up the coin on the table. Not as easy as if looks. Try this only with an expert present.
  • Shawn Moore, Auxiliarist was our cold-water instructor.
  • Ray Feller, Auxiliarist  dons his dry suit. The suit provides significant protection in cold water. Having the suit alone is not enough. Knowing how the human body reacts to sudden immersion was the classroom session of our training today.
  • These volunteers attending cold-water survival training today could be your neighbors. Flotillas from Solomons Island to Annapolis were represented today.  Guardians made sure our training was safe. Another reason why I love to say Guardians rock!
Comfortable Lifejackets
Lifejackets are comfortable and they save lives!

Lifejackets are comfortable and they save lives!

Archives
Categories
Admiral Lee on Bow Riding

Rear Admiral William "Dean" Lee

“You wouldn’t allow your kids to sit on the hood of your car, so why would you allow them to sit on the bow of your boat?”

Rear Admiral Dean Lee, 5th District commander, United States Coast Guard

The Drum Point Poll

The behaviors Maryland boaters need to change most.

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
Newsletters

Chesapeake Chatter

The Division 23 Chesapeake Chatter is available at the Division 23 website.

Blinker

The Blinker Newsletter is available at the Fabulous 5th Southern Website.

SITREP

The weekly CGUAX Newsletter is available at SITREP.

WAVES

THE RBS Department's newsletter WAVES - Watercraft and Vessel Safety is available at the RBS website.

eBeacon The CGAUXA eBeacon Magazine.

SafetySeal.net

SafetySeal.net Newsletter

Uptop in Operations

UPTOP in Operations Newsletter

Navigator Magazine

Navigator Auxiliary Magazine

Interpreter News

Interpreter News

Education Connection

Education Connection

Wear it Maryland

Always wear your life jacket!

Always wear your life jacket!

Our Facebook Fan Page
Paddlecraft Sticker

Get the sticker.

Link Policy

NOTICE/DISCLAIMER Links to non-Coast Guard entities are not under the control of the United States Coast Guard or the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, and are provided for the convenience of our customers. They do not, in any way, constitute an endorsement of the linked pages or any commercial or private issues or products presented there. We cannot make any warranty or representation concerning the content of these sites, or secondary sites from the pages to which they link.

Lightning Kills

Lightning Kills

Learn About the Flu at Flu.gov