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Boating Safety Tip of the Day
Tip of the Day: Watch Your Wake!

You are responsible for your vessel’s wake. Even traveling at slow speeds some vessels can leave a large wake that erodes shore lines, severely rocks nearby moored vessels, or swamps personal watercraft like canoes and kayaks.  Watch yours.

Posts Tagged ‘United States Coast Guard’

Do your children understand PWC operation and safety? Do you?

News Release
Date: Aug. 06, 2012
Ninth Coast Guard District
Contact: Ninth Coast Guard District External Affairs Office
Office: (216) 902-6020
Mobile: (216) 310-2608

CLEVELAND — The Coast Guard rescued two teenagers after the personal watercraft they were on became disabled and partially sank in Fairport Harbor, Fairport, Ohio, Saturday.

The names and hometowns of the teenagers are not being released and there is no Coast Guard imagery available.

The father of the two teens called Fairport 911 emergency dispatch after the teens did not return on the at the time they were supposed to.

A communications watchstander at Fairport, Ohio, received notification at 9 p.m. from Fairport Harbor Police Department reporting two teenagers on a personal watercraft were overdue 35 minutes to meet back with family.

A boatcrew from Station Fairport launched aboard a 25-foot Response Boat-Small.

The watchstander at Station Fairport broadcast an urgent marine information broadcast over VFH-FM marine radio.

While en route to the last known position of the two teens, the RB-S boatcrew saw a red flare in the sky and continued in that direction until locating the two teens in the water wearing life jackets near the personal watercraft.

The personal watercraft had become disabled and partially sank forcing, the teens into the water.

The boatcrew transferred the teens aboard the RB-S and towed the personal watercraft to the Fairport Harbor Port Authority.

“The Coast Guard was able to rescue these teens because of the quickness of their family to call 911 when the teens took longer than anticipated and because the teens helped us find them by shooting the flare into the air,” said Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew Ellinger, officer-of-the day at Station Fairport.

“It was good that they had all life-saving equipment aboard and were wearing life jackets.”

The Coast Guard reminds of some basic safety tips before their next outing:

File a . This includes telling family or friends where you are going, what you will be doing and how long you expect to be gone.

  •          Wear a . Coast Guard regulations require that all people on a personal watercraft wear a . There are life jackets designed specifically for personal watercraft. Buy one that fits well and always while you .
  •         Be aware of conditions and water temperature. Prepare for changes in and always remember to dress for the water not the .
  •           Stay hydrated. Bring plenty of water and food in case of emergenices.
  •           Seek qualified instruction to learn proper personal watercraft techniques, and basic first aid.
  •          Bring a VHF-FM radio. A cell phone is a good backup plan but will sometimes not get reception in certain areas.

Click here for information about float plans.

For more information about boating safety, go to http://www.uscgboating.org/.

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Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The United States Coast Guard — Proud History. Powerful Future.

Read the tips from the Coast Guard! hard but smart!

Date: Aug. 05, 2012
Contact: PADET Tampa Bay
Office: (305) 965-4672

SHELL ISLAND, Fla. — A 49-year-old male was rescued by the Coast Guard after he became stranded on Shell Island, Sunday.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector St. Petersburg received a call from a man stating he had been kayaking with his brother-in-law near Pass-A-Grille Beach, Fla., but was separated and all phone calls were going straight to voicemail.

Coast Guard Station St. Petersburg launched a 25-foot Response Boat-Small crew as well as an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from Coast Guard  Air Station Clearwater and a from Eckerd College Search and Rescue.

Crewmembers from the helicopter located the person on Shell Island waving his shirt at them.

The Coast Guard small boat crew was vectored in and passed a heaving line to the person so they could pull him into the boat.

The man was taken to Tierre Verde Marina, Fla., to meet with his family.

Eckerd SAR will retreive the kayak.

No injuries were reported.

The Coast Guard wants to remind kayakers of some basic safety tips before their next outing.

  •  File a . This includes telling family or friends where you are going, what you will be doing and how long you expect to be gone.
  •  Wear a life jacket. Coast Guard regulations require that all have a life jacket on board. There are life jackets designed specifically for paddlers. Buy one that fits well and always while you paddle.
  •  Be aware of and water temperature. Prepare for changes in weather and always remember to dress for the water not the weather.
  •  Stay hydrated. Bring plenty of water and food in case of emergenices.
  •  Seek qualified instruction to learn proper paddling techniques, and basic first aid.
  •  Bring a VHF-FM radio. A cell phone is a good backup plan but will sometimes not get reception in certain areas.

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Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The United States Coast Guard — Proud History. Powerful Future.

No injuries were reported.

Date: Aug. 04, 2012
Contact: Public Affairs Detachment Baltimore
Office: (410) 576-2541

BALTIMORE — The Coast Guard rescued a 50-year-old man after the 20-foot sailboat he was aboard capsized in Tangier Sound near Crisfield Saturday

The man’s wife contacted watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Baltimore at approximately 8:23 p.m. reporting her husband’s sailboat had capsized in Tangier Sound, and he was sitting on top of the overturned boat and required assistance.

A crew aboard a 25-foot Response Boat – Small from Crisfield arrived on scene and brought the man aboard their boat. He was transferred to a Deal Island Fire and Rescue boatcrew and taken to Deal Island.

No injuries were reported.

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Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The — Proud History. Powerful Future.

Make the choice to Maryland! The lifejacket will save your life!

Date: July 27, 2012
Contact: Petty Officer 1st Class Lauren Jorgensen
Office: (305) 318-1864

CHARLESTON, S.C. – Two people are safe on land after spending more than four hours in the water Thursday night after their 19-foot sailboat capsized near Myrtle Beach, S.C.

A Coast Guard watchstander at Sector Charleston, S.C. was notified of an overturned sailboat three miles off Myrtle Beach about 7 p.m. Thursday.

reports for the area indicate seas were about 4 to 6 feet.

A boatcrew from Georgetown, S.C., launched to search. Local authorities responded as well.

crews found the pair with their life jackets on one mile north of Apache Pier in Myrtle Beach Thursday evening more than four hours after they began searching.

“This case is an excellent example of how wearing a can save your life,” said Capt. Michael White, commander of Coast Guard Sector Charleston.  “Accidents on the water can happen to anyone, and wearing a life jacket when boating can significantly increase the ability to survive unpredictable accidents.”

To meet U.S. Coast Guard requirements, a boat must have a U.S. Coast Guard-approved Type I, II, III, or V life jacket for each person aboard. Boats 16 feet and longer must have at least one Type IV device as well. More information on U.S. Coast Guard requirements is available HERE.

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Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The — Proud History. Powerful Future.

Date: July 28, 2012
Contact: 5th District Public Affairs
Office: (757) 398-6272

PORTSMOUTH, Va. — Coast Guard units are responding Saturday to a vessel that sank 46 miles east of Ocean City, Md.

A 38-foot vessel with nine people aboard called Coast Guard watchstanders via VHF-FM radio at approximately 10:30 a.m., stating that they where .

A Coast Guard C-130 Hercules air crew from , N.C., were in the area assisting with an another disabled vessel when the request for help was received.

At approximately 11:00 a.m., the 38-foot vessel sank. The Coast Guard coordinated the pick-up of all nine people with two vessels in the area.  Multiple people where showing signs of medical .

A Coast Guard 47-foot Motor Life from Station Ocean City, Md., took all nine people aboard and is currently en route back to the station to waiting .

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Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The — Proud History. Powerful Future.

Date: July 25, 2012

Contact: Public Affairs Detachment Baltimore

Office: (410) 576-2541

BALTIMORE — The Coast Guard is asking for assistance with locating a caller after they received six false distress calls between May 1 and June 1 and conducted four searches involving multiple air and boat crews from the Coast Guard and local authorities.

All six distress calls were determined to have originated from the area of Middle River and involved the same male voice transmitting over VHF-FM channel 16 saying “, .”

The Coast Guard’s cost for the searches is estimated to be approximately $70,000.

In addition to cost, there is significant caused by making false distress calls.

“Making false distress calls limits the Coast Guard and our partners’ capabilities to assist those boaters that are in actual emergency situations,” said Capt. Kevin Kiefer, commander of . “Hoax radio calls also place first responders in as they work to assist the .”

Making a false is a felony punishable by law. The maximum penalty for making a false is six years in prison, a $5,000 civil fine, a $250,000 criminal fine and reimbursement to the Coast Guard.

Anyone with information regarding the calls is asked to contact Coast Guard Investigative Service Baltimore at 410-576-2515.

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Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The — Proud History. Powerful Future.

Date: July 14, 2012

Contact: Public Affairs Detachment Baltimore

Office: (410) 576-2541

BALTIMORE — The Coast Guard medevaced a 37-year-old man after the boat he was aboard allided with a day beacon in the near Tangier Island, Va., Friday.

The man contacted Coast Guard Sector Baltimore watchstanders at approximately 10:15 p.m., Friday reporting he had allided with an object in the water near Tangier Island and had injuries to himself and the other man aboard, who was unresponsive.

The man was able to moor the boat at a marina on Tangier Island. Accomack County emergency medical technicians arrived on scene and were able to give aid to the man and perform CPR on the other man, who was later pronounced dead.

A boatcrew aboard a 25-foot Response Boat - Small from Crisfield, Md., medevaced the 37-year-old man from Tangier Island to Crisfield and transferred him to awaiting emergency medical personnel.

He was taken to McCready Memorial Hospital in Crisfield for treatment.

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Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The — Proud History. Powerful Future.

News Release
Date: July 12, 2012

Contact: Public Affairs Detachment Baltimore

Office: (410) 576-2541

BALTIMORE — The Coast Guard medevaced a 59-year-old man from a 623-foot  that was anchored in the , Thursday.

A representative contacted Coast Guard Sector Baltimore watchstanders on behalf of the vessel at approximately 11 a.m. reporting the master of the Sanko Mineral and required .

“The vessel’s representative played a critical role in relaying the master’s distress to the Coast Guard,” said Lt. j.g. Benjamin Aaronson, a command duty officer.

A boatcrew aboard a 45-foot Response Boat – Medium from Coast Guard Station Annapolis arrived on scene and transferred the man aboard. The master was transported back to the station and transferred to awaiting emergency medical personnel and taken to Anne Arundel County Medical Center in Annapolis.

“We were able to give him while we were transiting back to the station,” said Petty Officer 2nd Class , an  certified boatcrew member of Station Annapolis. “This is an immediate treatment we were able to administer for his survival.”

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Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The — Proud History. Powerful Future.

Date: July 18, 2012
Contact: Petty Officer 1st Class Lauren Jorgensen
Office: (305) 318-1864

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A U.S. crew from Air Facility Charleston, S.C., was forced to land abruptly while searching for a possible boater in Monday night due to lights being shined into the cockpit of the helicopter from shore.

The life-threatening incident is not the first of its kind for Coast Guard aircrews, and puts the lives of the pilots, crew, citizens on the ground near the aircraft, and mariners in distress at risk.

The aircrew Monday night still had 40 minutes before their search for the source of call was complete when they were forced to land early.

Coast Guardsmen at Air Station Savannah, which provides crews for Air Facility Charleston, have experienced six separate lasing incidents in the past year and a half, four of which occurred during searches for mariners in distress.

When a laser is directed into a Coast Guard aircraft, the aircrew has to stop searching immediately and land. The crew is grounded until each person has an and is cleared by a . This process can take up to 24 hours, depending on when and where the incident occurred. Additionally, there is typically a two-to-three hour delay to get a new helicopter and crew on scene to resume a search.

“People need to consider how many lives they’re putting in danger before they choose to point a at an aircraft,” said Cmdr. Gregory Fuller, commanding officer of Air Station Savannah. “It’s not only incredibly for those in and around the aircraft, but it also keeps our aircrews from responding during maritime emergencies. This isn’t something we take lightly.”

The reports lasing incidents rose 902 percent from 2005 to 2011. Shining any laser at an aircraft is a under 14 CFR 19.11. Several people have been convicted under this and similar state laws. These convictions have resulted in prison terms as long as five years, fines of up to $11,000, and five years probation.

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Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The — Proud History. Powerful Future.

Date: July 17, 2012
U.S. Coast Guard

Contact: 1st District Public Affairs

Office: (617) 223-8515

Audio Available

Audio Available

Editors note: Media are invited to contact Lt. Bryan Swintek at the Southeastern New England Command center for interviews.

Sector Southeastern New England command center: (508)–457–3211

BOSTON — The Coast Guard is calling attention to the dangers and risks of calls after launching air and boat crews to respond to a radio transition of a child’s voice making a call Saturday at approximately 6:46 p.m.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Southeastern New England’s command center received the call. The call was made with no position or nature of distress and was received off a Rescue-21 communication tower. The R-21 is a system of radio towers and computer software along the coastline of the United States and helps determine the location of vessels by radio transmission. The location was narrowed down to potential areas in the vicinity of Narragansett Bay, Portsmouth, R.I.

An Air Station Cape Cod, Mass., MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter and a Station Castle Hill 45-foot -Medium were launched to search for source of the call.  Additionally, the Narragansett Bay strike force, a first of its kind mutual aid program between all the fire departments on Narragansett Bay, were notified and launched boats from Warwick, Portsmouth and Providence fire departments.  Each asset searched for more than one hour, investing a total of more than five hours of response time and found no vessels or people in distress.

The Coast Guard believes this call was a distress caused by a child playing on the radio. This case is the fourth in the southeastern New England area in the last month.

False alerts and hoax calls are particularly frustrating cases for both the maritime emergency responders and taxpayers. These cases unnecessarily put first responders in danger and waste valuable operational hours and cost.  The total search efforts associated with this call will be well over $20,000, $10,000 for one hour of helicopter search time and $3,000 each hour per small boat.

“The Coast Guard is required to search for every distress call regardless of the assumed source,” said Commander Jeannot Smith, Sector Southeastern New England chief of response operations. “Calls like this one can needlessly burnout our crews and divert our attention from mariners who are actually in distress.”

The Coast Guard urges mariners to educate their children on proper radio protocol and alert the Coast Guard if a call is made or if they know identity of a suspected hoax caller.

Below are some past hoax and false distress cases.

United States v. Flores, No. 09-00161 (N.D. Ohio Nov. 23, 2009) (defendant pled guilty, sentenced to thirty-six (36) months supervised release, and ordered to pay $112,735.70 in restitution.

United States v. Johnson, No. 04-00117 (W.D. Mich. Jan. 27, 2005) (defendant pled guilty, sentenced to twenty-four (24) months imprisonment, and ordered to pay $56,958.30 in restitution.

United States v. Baldwin, No. 03-05356 (W.D. Wash. Mar. 5, 2004) (defendant pled guilty, sentenced to twelve (12) months and one (1) day imprisonment followed by thirty-six (36) months of supervised release, and ordered to pay $194,587.70 in restitution)

In United States v. Feener, No. 05-10287 (D. Mass. July 26, 2005), the defendant was charged under 14 U.S.C. § 88 (c) for having radioed the Coast Guard from his home on two separate occasions, both times claiming to be the captain of a fishing vessel . Both of the defendant’s calls resulted in futile, hours-long searches and the deployment of Coast Guard air and marine assets. The defendant ultimately pled guilty to sending a false distress message in violation of 14 U.S.C. § 88(c); he was sentenced to eighteen (18) months imprisonment, to be followed by thirty-six (36) months supervised release, and was ordered to pay $82,004.00 in restitution to the U.S. Coast Guard.

The defendant in United States. v. D’Addieco, No. 09-10087 (D. Mass. Jan. 21, 2010), was charged under 14 U.S.C. § 88(c) for having called 911 to falsely report, under a pseudonym, that he was onboard a non-existent vessel that was sinking in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, with four passengers onboard. The defendant pled guilty to making a false distress call in violation of 14 U.S.C. § 88(c); he was sentenced to three (3) months imprisonment, to be followed by twenty-four (24) months supervised release, and was ordered to pay $56,459.70 in restitution to the U.S. Coast Guard.

R-21 False hoax call transmission

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Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The — Proud History. Powerful Future

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Remember the Maryland 25
Dead Maryland Boaters in 2011

Three Maryland boating deaths in 2012. Three sailboat emergencies, 1 death; 1 swimmer death; 1 allision death with two trauma injuries; 1 major injury from gasoline engine fire,

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Our Instagrams
  • A foggy day in Southern Maryland. Good morning shipmates.
  • Wear it!  News media ask the boaters you photograph why they don't. Start the discussion and save a life.
  • Our cold-water survival training was ultimately made possible by the Guardians of  U S Coast Guard Station Annapolis.  Two Guardians hauled each of us onto the deck of a fast boat.  During the training they made sure we were safe.  I am so proud to serve with these men and women. Each one is an outstanding professional.  Thank you Station Annapolis.
  • Once a crew is in the water survival and staying together is key. Chaining together as they do here the crew shares warmth and prolongs life.
  • A face that could be your next door neighbor. Coast Guard Auxiliary members from three Maryland flotillas took their annual cold-water training at Coast Guard Station Annapolis. Bill Smith from the Drum Point Flotilla reflects the serious of his training in his expression. Bill is not new to cold water.
  • To. feller and Bill Smith, Coast Guard Auxiliary, arrive at Coast Guard Station Annapolis for cold-water training.
  • A two-minute lesson that covered finger dexterity after cold water immersion. We placed a hand in cold water while the instructor spoke for two minutes. One we removed our hands we had to pick up the coin on the table. Not as easy as if looks. Try this only with an expert present.
  • Shawn Moore, Auxiliarist was our cold-water instructor.
  • Ray Feller, Auxiliarist  dons his dry suit. The suit provides significant protection in cold water. Having the suit alone is not enough. Knowing how the human body reacts to sudden immersion was the classroom session of our training today.
  • These volunteers attending cold-water survival training today could be your neighbors. Flotillas from Solomons Island to Annapolis were represented today.  Guardians made sure our training was safe. Another reason why I love to say Guardians rock!
Comfortable Lifejackets
Lifejackets are comfortable and they save lives!

Lifejackets are comfortable and they save lives!

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Admiral Lee on Bow Riding

Rear Admiral William "Dean" Lee

“You wouldn’t allow your kids to sit on the hood of your car, so why would you allow them to sit on the bow of your boat?”

Rear Admiral Dean Lee, 5th District commander, United States Coast Guard

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The behaviors Maryland boaters need to change most.

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